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AfoM. QoAolUia 



i^-^i 



1966-1967 




THE BULLETIN 

OF THE 
NORTH CAROLINA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

Number 187 ^P""' ^'^^ 

James A. Graham, Commissicmer 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Tobacco Withstands The Battles of 1966 5 

Flue-Cured Situation and Outlook, 1967 g 

Burley Situation and Outlook, 1967 12 

State Summary, 1966-67 j4 

North Carolina Tobacco Warehouse Sales Report, 1966-67 16 

Summary of Dealer and Warehouse Resales, 1966 18 

Producer and Gross Sales of Flue-Cured Tobacco By States, 1966 18 

Stabilization Receipts by Belts, 1966 I9 

Flue-Cured Movement In and Out of North Carolina . .19 

Burley Movement In and Out of North Carolina 19 

North Carolina Flue-Cured Crops, 1919-1966 20 

North Carolina Burley Crops, 1928-1966 21 

North Carolina Flue-Cured Tobacco Allotments, 1967 22 

North Carolina Burley Tobacco Allotments, 1967 24 

North Carolina Tobacco Warehouses and Operators 

By Belts and Markets 25 

Domestic Cigarette Consumption By Kinds, 1965 Back Cover 



For free distribution by the Tobacco Section, 
Markets Division, North Carolina Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, Raleigh, N. C. 



4/67— 6M 



FOREWORD 

The eighteenth annual issue of the North Carolina 
Tobacco Report has been compiled and prepared by 
J. H. Cyrus, in charge of the Tobacco Marketing Sec- 
tion, and Roger L. Mozingo, tobacco marketing special- 
ist. Division of Markets of the North Carolina Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, in cooperation with the United 
States Department of Agriculture under the AMA 
Matching Fund Program. In addition to his responsi- 
bilities as director of the Tobacco Section, Mr. Cyrus is 
also a member of the Board of Directors of the Tobacco 
Tax Council and the Tobacco Growers Information 
Committee. 

Credit is due the Cooperative Crop Reporting Serv- 
ice of the North Carolina and United States Depart- 
ments of Agriculture, the U. S. Tobacco Division 
Consumer and Marketing Service, and the Agricultural 
Stabilization Conservation Service for their contribu- 
tions. 

This issue of the Tobacco Report is dedicated to the 
Tobacco Tax Council, which is under the executive 
directorship of William A. O'Flaherty, in recognition 
of the tremendous job it is doing in the continuous 
battles to help curb the staggering burden of taxation 
on cigarettes and other tobacco products by state and 
local governments. Had it not been for the untiring 
efforts of the Tax Council, the average cigarette tax 
of taxing states would have been considerably higher 
than the present average of slightly more than 7 cents 
per package. ^_ 



--^^(3u>uL*-, 



CoTnmissioner of Agriculture 



Tobacco Withstands the Battles of 1966 

The United States tobacco industry enjoyed a good year in 
1966, in spite of the continuous battles waged against tobacco by 
self-appointed anti-tobacco critics and the endless spiral of puni- 
tive taxation against cigarettes and other tobacco products. The 
health and tax battles will continue on, but there is evidence 
that the tobacco industry will stand its ground against these 
unwarranted attacks and make further gains in 1967. 

Current statistics show that cigarette production and con- 
sumption climbed to a new record high during 1966, with total 
production estimated at 571 billion cigarettes. Of this total, the 
tax paid domestic consumption reached a new peak of 522 billion, 
plus another 25 billion of non-tax paid cigarettes that went to 
U. S. Armed Forces overseas, Puerto Rico, and other U. S. 
islands. Exports of cigarettes in 1966 are estimated at 24 billion, 
an increase of about 4 percent over 1965. These gains made by 
the tobacco industry added much to the overall economy from 
the farmer to the manufacturer, particularly in North Carolina. 

The phenomenal growth of cigarette usage has been accom- 
panied by a steady growth in the tax burden imposed on cig- 
arettes. During the past year, federal, state, and local govern- 
ments took from the pockets of consumers $3.7 billion in direct 
excise taxes on cigarettes. Of this total, federal tax amounted 
to more than $2 billion; state taxes rose to $1.6 billion; and 
local taxes accounted for about $64 million. It is significant to 
note that cigarette taxes are approximately 4.5 times as much 
as tobacco farmers received for the tobacco used in domestically 
consumed cigarettes. 

The average price per pack of cigarettes for the United States 
is now at 30.5 cents with an average of 16 cents tax on each 
pack. Thus, the taxes imposed at the three levels of government 
makes the cost of cigarettes to the consumer about twice as high 
as it would be in the absence of these taxes. In North Carolina, 
which is now the only state without a direct cigarette tax, the 
average cost of a pack of cigarettes is 22.4 cents. This is 2.5 to 
13.5 cents less per pack than the average cost of cigarettes in 
any other state in the United States including the District of 
Columbia. 

The question is often asked, "Why should North Carolina be 
the lone state without a cigarette tax?" The simple answer is 
the fact that tobacco is the firm foundation of our economy in the 




Tax cigarettes and tobacco products in North Carolina? ! I I # & X * — NO! 



"Tarheel State." Last year, North Carolina produced 68 percent 
of all the flue-cured tobacco grown m the United States. Flue- 
cured and burley tobacco is grown by some 200,000 farm fami- 
lies in 92 of the state's 100 counties. One acre in every ten of 
harvested crop land in North Carolina is planted in tobacco. In 
1966 tobacco accounted for 65 percent of the total cash receipts 
from "Tarheel" crops, returning the flue-cured and burley grow- 
ers of this state $518 million. 

North Carolina tobacco has a unique role in our economy. It 
is not only important to the farmer ; but it is also a vital manu- 
facturing industry, and it makes a great contribution to our 
distributive and service enterprises. In 1966, manufacturers in 
North Carolina produced about 63 percent of all the cigarettes 
manufactured in the United States. The value of the North Caro- 
lina manufactured tobacco products is set at $875.5 million and 
is surpassed only by textiles, with $1.4 billion. Over 40,000 
establishments in North Carolina sell these cigarettes and other 



Cigarette Taxes As A Percentage 
of Retail Price 1966*' 



state 



Weighted State taxes 
average price per 

per pacltage package 



Ala. 31.6^* 

Alaska 35.7 

Ariz. 29.2 

Ark. 30.4 

Calif. 26.0* 

Colo. 28.2* 

Conn. 31.1 

Del. 30.7 

D. C. 25.7 

Fla. 30.2 

Ga. 31.5 

Hawaii 31.1 

Idaho 30.1 

111. 30.1 

Ind. 29.1 

Iowa 32.0 

Kans. 31.0 

Ky. 25.0 

La. 31.5 

Maine 30.3 

Md. 29.4 

Mass. 33.6 

Mich. 30.0 

Minn. 30.9 

Miss. 31.6 

Mo. 27.5* 

Mont. 31.3 

Neb. 31.4 

Nev. 30.2 

N. H. 26.5 

N. J. 34.2* 

N. M. 31.5* 

N. Y. 34.7* 

N. C. 22.4 

N. D. 30.5 

Ohio 27.0 

Okla. 30.7 

Ore. 27.5 

Pa. 30.1 

R. I. 31.0 

S. C. 27.3 

S. D. 31.3 

Tenn. 29.6* 

Tex. 34.4 

Utah 31.5 

Vt. 31.8 

Va. 26.3* 

Wash. 35.0 

W. Va. 29.5 

Wise. 32.8 

Wyo. 27.4 
Average (Median) 
for all states 30.5 
** Source: Tobacco Tax Council 
* Taxes imposed by municipalities not 



7.0^ 

8.0 

6.5 

8.0 

3.0 

5.0 

8.0 

7.0 

3.0 

8.0 

8.0 

8.0 

7.0 

7.0 

6.0 

8.0 

8.0 

2.5 

8.0 

8.0 

6.0 

10.0 
7.0 
8.0 
9.0 
4.0 
8.0 
8.0 
7.0 

4.5 
11.0 

8.0 

10.0 

None 

8.0 

5.0 

8.0 

4.0 

8.0 

8.0 

5.0 

8.0 

7.0 
11.0 

8.0 
10.0 

2.5 
11.0 

6.0 
10.0 

4.0 

8.0 



State and Federal 

taxes 

per pack age 

15.0«f 

16.0 

14.5 

16.0 

11.0 

13.0 

16.0 

15.0 

11.0 

16.0 

16.0 

16.0 

15.0 

15.0 

14.0 

16.0 

16.0 

10.5 

16.0 

16.0 

14.0 

18.0 

15.0 

16.0 

17.0 

12.0 

16.0 
16.0 
15.0 
12.5 
19.0 
16.0 
18.0 

8.0 
16.0 
13.0 
16.0 
12.0 
16.0 
16.0 
13.0 
16.0 
15.0 
19.0 
16.0 
18.0 
10.5 
19.0 
14.0 
18.0 
12.0 

16.0 

included. 



Taxes as a percentage 
of average retail price 
State Federal 



22.2% 

22.4 

22.3 

26.3 

11.5 

17.7 

25.7 

22.8 

11.7 

26.5 

25.4 

25.7 

23.3 

23.3 

20.6 

25.0 

25.8 

10.0 

25.4 

26.4 

20.4 

29.8 

23.3 

25.9 

28.5 

14.5 

25.5 

25.5 

23.2 

17.0 

32.2 

25.4 

28.8 


26.2 
18.5 
26.0 
14.5 
26.6 
25.8 
18.3 
25.5 
23.6 
32.0 
25.4 
31.4 
9.5 
31.4 
20.4 
30.5 
14.6 

25.4 



47.5% 

44.8 

49.7 

52.6 

42.3 

46.1 

51.4 

48.9 

42.8 

53.0 

50.8 

51.4 

49.8 

49.8 

48.1 

50.0 

51.6 

42.0 

50.8 

52.8 

47.6 

53.6 

50.0 

51.8 

63.8 

43.6 

51.1 

51.0 

49.7 
47.2 

55.6 
50.8 
51.9 

35.7 
52.5 
48.1 
52.1 
43.6 
53.2 
51.6 
47.6 
51.1 
50.7 
55.2 
50.8 
56.6 
39.9 
54.3 
47.5 
54.9 
43.8 

50.8 



tobacco products. The retail value of tobacco products in North 
Carolina in 1966 was more than $4.8 billion. 

Last year North Carolina tobacco manufacturers paid taxes in 
this state in the amount of approximately $37 million. Of this 
amount $15 million was in state corporate income tax; about $3 
million was in state franchise tax; another $10 million was paid 
in local property taxes. Employees of manufacturers pay about 
$4 million in personal income tax and consumers paid more than 
$5 million in sales tax. 

Tobacco grown in North Carolina is popular in the world 
market places and helps this nation in its balance-of -payment 
programs. North Carolina ports at Morehead City and Wilmmg- 
ton shipped well over 100 million pounds of tobacco to overseas 
markets in 1966. This was about one-fourth of all leaf exported 
from the United States. 

Thus, North Carolina truly does have a tobacco economy, and 
any unwarranted health claims or punitive taxation against the 
tobacco industry is definitely an attack against the economy of 
the "Tarheel State." 



Flue Cured Situation and Outlook 1967 

In 1966, the second year under acreage-poundage quotas, the 
flue-cured tobacco marketed showed further improvements in 
smoking qualities as they relate to usability. There was also a 
further reduction in the surplus stocks which were at a record 
level two years ago. Another obvious development in the 1966 
market was the establishment of a definite trend toward total 
loose-leaf sales. This trend will probably mature within the next 
two years to bring about a complete transition in the method of 
marketing flue cured tobacco in the Carolinas and Virginia. 

In 1966 approximately 44 percent of the entire flue cured crop 
types 11-14 was sold loose-leaf. Untied sales in the traditionally 
tied area of the Carolinas and Virginia last year amounted to 
about 37 percent of producers sales, or 364 million pounds. On 
a grade for grade comparative basis, the average prices paid for 
untied tobacco showed a slight advantage over the season aver- 
age prices paid for tied tobacco, when all belts outside the 
Georgia-Florida belt were averaged together. 

Supply Situation 

The surplus stocks of flue cured tobacco have reduced steadily 
during the past two years under acreage-poundage quotas. It is 
estimated that the flue cured carryover at the beginning of the 
1967 market year on July 1, will be down to approximately 2,255 
million pounds. This will be 185 million pounds below the mid- 
1966 level and 300 million below the record carryover on Julv 1 
1965. 

Almost 30 percent of the improvement in surplus stocks can 
be attributed to the fact that total marketings during the last 
two years have fallen 87 million pounds below the allotted quota. 
Therefore, with the net cumulative undermarketings of the past 
two years, it is expected that the 1967 marketings will exceed 
those of the past two seasons and be equal to approximately 
1,200 million pounds. If the 1967 marketings should approximate 
1,200 million pounds, with a carryover on July 1 of 2,255 
million pounds, the 1967-68 total supply would be about 3,445 
million pounds, or about 90 million less than the 1966-67 supply. 
This will be the third successive year with downward adjust- 
ment in the supply of flue cured tobacco from the record level 
of 3,774 million pounds during the 1964-65 season. 

8 




The need for improvements in loo»e-leaf packaging is quite evicient in the 
above picture of a typical loose-leaf sole. 



Stabilization Stocks 

Sales from the Flue Cured Tobacco Cooperative Stabilization 
Corporation stocks reached a new record of 255 million pounds 
in 1966. This reduced Stabilization stocks of old tobacco to 622 
million pounds on January 1, 1967. However, Stabilization re- 
ceived from the 1966 crop almost 75 million pounds, which gave 
them a total stock of about 697 million pounds at the beginning 
of the year. 

Stabilization continued the policy started last year of offering 
certain specified old inventories to the trade through sealed bids 
on a "where is as is basis." The 25 million pounds left in the 
inventories from the 1960 crop was offered on closed bids early 
in this year, and by the end of March all but about 1 million 
pounds of the 1960 inventories had been sold. During the first 
three months of 1967 sales from stabilization stocks amounted 
to approximately 65 million pounds, reducing stabilization's 
stocks to 632 million pounds as of April 1, 1967. 

Domestic and Export Market 

It now appears that the total domestic and export disappear- 
ance of flue cured during the 1966-67 market year will reach a 
new record high of around 1,300 million pounds. This would be 



approximately 19 million pounds more than the previous record 
disappearance of 1,281 million in 1955. 

The record cigarette production during the past year is a good 
indication that the domestic industry had a good year. This is 
substantiated by the fact that most companies reported a record 
income in 1966. However, when we look at the progress made by 
the cigarette industry in terms of pounds of tobacco used, it is 
quite evident that the tobacco farmer's share of the domestic 
market did not increase in proportion to the increase in cigarette 
sales. For instance, the domestic use of flue cured during the 
1965 market year was approximately 752 million pounds or 
about 3 percent less than the previous year, while cigarette 
production during 1965 was up almost 3 percent. In 1966 cig- 
arette production rose another 2.5 percent, but current estimates 
indicate that there will be only a slight increase in the domestic 
use of flue cured for the 1966 market year, possibly up to 
about 755 million pounds. 

The two major reasons why the manufacturers' leaf usage has 
not kept pace with cigarette production is because of the steady 
increase in filters, at the rate of 2 to 3 percent annually, and 
the increased use of reconstituted sheet tobacco which more 
fully utilizes the entire leaf of tobacco. Thus, the farmers 
domestic market for flue cured tobacco during the past two 
years has been about "status quo." 

The 1966 flue cured market received its greatest boost from 
the export buying power. Current estimates indicate that 
export for the 1966-67 market year may reach 545 million 
pounds. This would be 122 million more than the relative low 
level of 423 million pounds exported the previous year, and the 
third largest exports of flue cured on record. 

The factors responsible for the sharp rise in export demand 
last year were: 

(1) Voluntary bans by several countries against tobacco im- 
ports from Rhodesia. These sanctions have now been 
made mandatory by the United Nations Security Council. 

(2) Broadening of the export payment program, which pro- 
vided for a 5 cents per pound across the board subsidy on 
all tobacco entering the export trade. 

(3) The continuous increase in cigarette consumption abroad. 

(4) The improvement in smoking quality and usability of 
U. S. flue cured under acreage-poundage quotas. 

10 



Market Outlook 1967 

The general market outlook for flue cured tobacco in 1967 looks 
very favorable. There is evidence that the U. S. tobacco industry 
will stand its ground against many of the unwarrented attacks 
by anti-tobacco critics. Thus, the demand for domestic buyers 
should remain steady to slightly stronger. The export market 
will be stronger in 1967, IF there is no agreement to lift the 
United Nations sanction against trade with Rhodesia. The major 
marketing problem in 1967 will continue to be that of regulating 
the flow of tobacco through the market channels at mid-season 
to ease congestion in processing plants, regardless of whether 
it is sold loose-leaf or tied. 

The average support price on the 1967 crop will be 2 percent 
higher than in 1966, because of further increases in cost of pro- 
duction. This has pushed the average support price up to 59.9 
cents per pound compared to 58.8 last year, and will increase the 
support price on most grades by 1 to 2 cents. Loose-leaf sales, 
which have been extended from 12 days to 95 hours or about 21 
days in 1967, will be supported at 3 cents less than tied tobacco. 
Based on the current trends in the tobacco industry and the 
mounting pressure to require cigarette manufacturers to label 
each brand as to nicotine and tar contents, it is very likely that 
the market demand in 1967 will continue in the direction toward 
good smoking tobacco of medium to thin body, and thoroughly 
ripe to give it grain plus full flavor and aroma. If the 1967 flue 
cured growing season should be favorable for the production of 
a good smoking crop, the 1967 auction average will likely move 
upward to another record level of better than 70 cents per 
pound, which would break the record average of approximately 
67 cents established in 1966. 

The national flue cured quota for 1967 of 1,126 million pounds 
continues unchanged for the third year under the acreage- 
poundage program. However, the adjustments in individual 
farm quotas to reflect the cumulative net under marketings of 
the past two seasons is expected to result in a larger crop in 
1967 than in either of the past two years. In the March 1 survey, 
U. S. flue cured growers indicated their intentions of planting 
623,570 acres in 1967 which would be 3 percent more than in 
1966 because of undermarketing adjustments and growers' in- 
tentions to plant closer to their full allotments. Application of 
an average yield per acre, based on the more moderate yields 

n 



under poundage quotas, to the intended acreage would produce a 
1967 crop of about 1,200 million pounds. 

In North Carolina the 1967 net quota including undermarket- 
ings will be approximately 787 million pounds. Should the state 
reach its full quota, the gross income from flue cured tobacco 
in North Carolina conceivably could reach or even pass the pre- 
vious record of $550 million set in 1964. 



Burley Situation and Outlook 1967 

Burley tobacco farmers had another good year in 1966. The 
fact that growers were satisfied could have had some influence 
on the referendum conducted by mail ballot during the week of 
February 27-March 3, in which growers disapproved acreage- 
poundage quotas for the second time in 12 months. About 59 
percent of those voting by mail ballots this year favored acreage- 
poundage quotas, however, a two-thirds majority is required by 
law. The referendum held in March of 1966 received a 57 percent 
favorable vote, which was also short of the two-thirds majority 
necessary to put the program into effect. 

The percentages of favorable votes for burley acreage-pound- 
age by states for the 1966 and 1967 referendums are shown 
below : 



Percent 1967 



Kentucky 73 -g 

Tennessee 14 ,« 

Virginia 48 40 

North Carolina 68 ha 

Ohio 80 ?J 

Indiana 70 go 

Missouri 63 37 

W. Virginia 68 rq 

Others 69 66 

Since acreage-poundage quotas were not approved by growers, 
the acreage allotment program approved for the years of 1965,' 
1966 and 1967 will remain in effect. A referendum will be held 
m late 1967 or early 1968 in which burley growers will determine 
whether they favor continuation of the present acreage allot- 
ment program for the crop years of 1968, 1969 and 1970. Under 
the law, burley growers cannot be offered another referendum on 
acreage-poundage again until the 1969 crop year. 

12 



Burley Supplies 

The producer sales of all burley in 1966 were 585 million 
pounds, about the same as in 1965, even though acreage reduc- 
tions amounted to about 13 percent. Nevertheless the 1966-67 
total supply of 1,980 million pounds is estimated at 1 percent 
below a year earlier and 2.5 percent below the peak level of two 
years ago. 

The basic allotments for burley growers will be the same in 
1967 as they were the previous year, indicating that approxi- 
mately 240,800 acres will be planted. If average yields per acre 
are in hne with recent years, this should turn out a crop in 
1967 of about 590 million pounds. 

It is estimated that the carryover on October 1, 1967, which 
is the beginning of a new burley marketing year, will be around 
1,360 million pounds, or about 35 miUion less than October 1 of 
last year. Thus, the 1967-68 supply of burley— the 1967 crop plus 
the carryover— should be around 1,950 million pounds. This 
would be 30 million less than for the current year, and would 
be the third straight year that supplies have declined. 

Burley Outlook 

The support price on the 1967 crop of burley will be up 2 per- 
cent, because of the continuous rise in cost of production. Thus, 
the average support level this year will be 61.8 cents per pound 
compared to 60.6 last year. This increase will add 1 to 2 cents to 
the support price of most grades sold during the 1967 season. 

There is every indication that the domestic and export demand 
will remain firm during the 1967 marketing season. With a good 
smoking crop the auction average should be well in line with 
the 67 cents average of last season or slightly higher. Thus, 
burley growers should experience another good year in 1967. 



13 



State Marketing Summary 1966-67 

Generally speaking, North Carolina flue-cured tobacco growers enjoyed a 
fairly successful second year under the acreage-poundage program despite 
adverse growing conditions in some areas and the ever plaguing mid-season 
market congestion. A continued steady demand by domestics and keener 
competition among exporters led the way for an all-time record high crop 
average of $66.65. In 1966 as in 1965, growers failed to produce their 
allotted pounds. Of the 806 million pounds allotted, growers sold only 760 
million — leaving 46 million pounds of undermarketings to be brought for- 
ward by individual growers. 

As growers have become accustomed to producing under the new pro- 
gram, certain trends have developed which point to a definite improvement 
in the quality and usability of our tobacco. For instance, in 1964 the per- 
centage of the crop grading into straight grades of fully mature and 
mellow tobacco was only 49^^^; in 1965, first year under acreage-poundage, 
the percentage increased to 61; in 1966 the figure jumped to 70 percent. 
During the same period less desirable grades of variegated (KL, KF, KM, 
and KV) showed a sharp decline from 30 percent to 14 percent. 

Flue-cured markets in North Carolina sold for producers 708,840,692 
pounds in 1966 for an all-time high average of $66.65 per hundred grossing 
$472,433,226 a substantial gain over 1965 when growers sold 651,525,240 
pounds for $417,585,147 at an average price of $64.09. 

Price support was made available on all grades marketed untied during 
the first 12 sales days in each belt. A season summary indicates that 
grade-for-grade there was little or no difference in the prices paid for tied 
or untied tobacco. This obvious lack of differential was the major factor 
that caused growers to rush their tobacco from one belt to another during 
the limited loose-leaf sales in each belt. 

TYPE 13: The North Carolina Border Belt opened strong on August 9 
and proceeded to set an all time high belt average of $68.59. Offerings con- 
sisted of a smaller percent of good and fair quality than was evidenced in 
1965. Bulk of sales consisted principally of poor to fair leaf, low smoking 
leaf, fair lugs, low and fair primings, and non-descript. Stabilization re- 
ceipts for the season amounted to 1.0 percent of gross sales, a record low. 

Grade averages moved up $1.00 to $13.00 per hundred over 1965 levels, 
most were up $2.00 to $6.00. The major increases were in lower quality leaf 
and non-descript grades. A sharp demand was indicated for all grades. 
Slightly over one-third of the untied grades averaged even with or above 
the tied tobacco. 

Volume of producer sales was down almost 12 million pounds from last 
year and was the smallest since 1958. During 1965 producers sold 
154,189,734 pounds, averaging $65.53 for a gross return of $101,045,590. In 
1966 producers sold 126,477,944 at $68.65 for a gross income of $86,828,958. 
Border Belt Markets Closed on October 20 After 47 Sales Days. 
TYPE 12: Record high average prices were paid for a ripe and highly 
usable crop in the Eastern Belt for 1966. Offerings contained a larger 
percentage of leaf and smoking leaf but fewer cutters, lugs and primings 
than in 1965. With the exception of 1965, producers volume in the east was 
lowest since 1957. 

14 



The majority of tied averages were up $1.00 to $5.00, while most untied 
grades advanced $3.00 to $10.00. Greatest gains were in lower qualities 
and non-descript. Almost 45 percent of untied grades averaged even with or 
higher than their respective tied grades. 

Growers, in 1966, sold 328,736,141 pounds at a record $68.59 for a gross 
of $224,475,919. 296,024,450 pounds averaged $63.30 in 1965 for a gross of 
$187,386,497. ^,., „, 

The Eastern Belt closed November 18, with final sales at Wilson after 
61 sales days — 19 more than in 1965. 

TYPE 11-B: Middle Belt sales were marked by a substantial increase in 
poundage over 1965, in value paid to growers, and length of season. The 
general average was up only slightly over 1965 but fell short of the 1961 

record. . , 

Adverse growing conditions caused a decrease in the proportion ot good 
and fair offerings, while more low and poor tobacco was sold. Variegated 
leaf (B-K) and smoking leaf (H-K) made up over one-third of total sales. 

Losses of $1.00 to $3.00 were fairly consistent for tied grades of unripe 
K and green leaf, lugs and non-descript. Untied increases ranged from 
$1.00 to $9.00 with non-descript receiving the largest gains. Approximately 
two-thirds of the untied grade averages equaled or exceeded their tied 
counterparts. 

In 1966, growers sold 143,394,974 at a $64.31 average for a gross of 
$92,214,964. In 1965 growers sold 108,026,541 at $63.36 for a gross of 
$68,444,459. 

Markets opened September 8 and closed December 2 with final sales at 
Durham and Oxford. The season consisted of 59 sales days— 18 more than 
in 1965. 

TYPE 11-A: Growing conditions in the Old Belt were anything but de- 
sirable during 1966. As a result, marketing was composed of smaller per- 
centages of good and fair qualities and more low and poor grades. The 
tobacco was generally darker in color. Variegated grades made up over 
one-half the crop. 

Grade prices for tied tobacco decreased $1.00 to $7.00 mainly for unripe, 
immature, and non-descript. The remaining tied grades were unchanged or 
up $1.00 to $3.00. Untied offerings were up $3.00 to $9.00 with greatest 
improvement in leaf, non-descript, low quality lugs and primings. Untied 
averages were the same or higher than tied for over three-fourths of the 
grades quoted. 

Old Belt farmers sold 110,231,633 pounds for $67,721,879 averaging $61.44. 
In 1965 growers sold 93,284,515 pounds at record high $65.08 for a gross of 
$60,708,601. 

Markets opened September 20 and closed finally on January 10— a total 
of 61 sales days as compared with 46 in 1965. 

TYPE 31: North Carolina's three Burley Markets began their 1966-67 
market season on Monday, November 28. Volume of sales was below normal 
on opening due primarily to the lateness of the crop and poor curing con- 
ditions. No-grade, wet and unsound tobacco was quite prevalent on opening 
day and hit a peak just prior to closing for the holidays on December 20. 
Estimates were that two-thirds of the crop had been sold by the holidays. 
(Continued on page 24) 

15 



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17 



Summary of N. C. Dealer and 
Warehouse Receipts- 1966 



Belt 



Pounds Dollars 



Border Belt 

Sf^ler 1,807,904 1,087,594 1 3 

Warehouse 9,484,568 6,374,833 6.9 

Eastern Belt 

J^ealer 4,233,671 2,559,651 1.2 

Warehouse 15,658,825 10,181,279 4.5 

Middle Belt 

Scaler 3,806,992 2,231,795 2.5 

Warehouse 7,370,144 4,606,882 4.8 

Old Belt 

^^ea'er 2,099,603 1,191,238 1 7 

Warehouse 8,376,535 5,277,707 7.0 

Total Flue-Cured Resales 52,838,242 33,510,979 6.9 

Burley Belt 

^^f^^^l 572,552 368,293 3 1 

Warehouse 1,937,610 1,280,094 10.4 

Total Burley Resales 2,510,162 1,648,387 13.5 



Producer and Gross Sales of Flue-Cured 
Tobacco by States -1966 

State p„„„ . Pfoducer Sales Gross Sales 

^^5^5 P"""**' Average Pounds Average 



N- C 708,840,692 $66.65 761,678,934 

Va 145,278,250 63.20 .?^"'°.3J^ 



$66.42 



X''„ i40,i:/»,Z!>u 63.20 152,919,487 63 00 

S- C .lUrAtl 69.51 106 623 390 69.30 

'f 135,394,275 69.86 149,765,022 69 54 

1^ 19,609,853 71.08 22,156:617 70.98 

'^''^^^ 1,106,200,267 66.81 1,193,143,450 66.62 



18 



Stabilization Receipts by Belts- 1966 



Belt Type 



Producer Stabilization Percentaee 

Sales (lbs.) Receipts (lbs.) Stab. Received 



Old Belt llA 255,509,883 49,001,743 19.2 

mddfe Belt IIB 143,394,974 15,215,149 10.6 

Eastern Belt 12 328,736,141 7,356,560 2.^ 

Boeder Belt 13 222 429 051 2,499,576 1.1 

Ga Fla. Belt : 14 154;678,498 378,980 0.3 

Total .11-14 1,104,748,547 74,452,008 tT 



Flue-Cured Movement In and Out of 
North Carolina 



N C. Tobacco Sold Ont of State Out of State Tobacco Sold in N. C. 

(Pounds) (Pounds) 

1966 1965 1966 1965 



Va 51,694,338 36,884,113 7,206,162 ,^'604,100 

S c 9821461 15,378,431 16,285,158 12,749,416 

Ga. ' 13,397,020 6,014,602 300,681 

Fla. 

Ala. 



218^590 11,420 21,876 464 

6,276 1,364 



Total 75,131,409 58,288,586 23,820,153 20,355,344 



Burley Tobacco Movements In and Out 
of North Carolina 



N. C. Tobacco Sold Out of State Out of State Tobacco Sold in N. C. 

(Pounds) (Pounds) 



1966 1965 



1965 



Tenn 3,498,270 3,770,604 525,068 551,394 

ienn. ^, »o, ^, 1,209,496 1,359,643 

^"/Va. — — 24,002 18,652 



Ga. 

S. C. 



4,029 53,032 

578 492 



Total 3,506,472 3,772,086 1,763,173 1,983,213 



19 



North Carolina Flue-Cured Crops 
191 9-1 966-^ 



Yield Per 

Acre 
(Pounds) 



1919 


521,000 


612 


319,276 


$157,340 


$49.30 


1920 


621,900 


681 


423,703 


88,271 


20.80 


1921 


414,900 


594 


246,540 


60,402 


24.50 


1922 


444,000 


611 


271,170 


74,572 


27.50 


1923 


544,300 


728 


396,354 


81,998 


20.70 


1924 


473,500 


585 


276,819 


62,597 


22.60 


1925 


536,200 


696 


373,352 


83,756 


22.40 


1926 


546,700 


692 


378,274 


96,762 


25.60 


1927 


639,600 


755 


482,982 


100,414 


20.80 


1928 


712,400 


692 


493,132 


93,450 


19.00 


1929 


729,300 


665 


484,630 


89,470 


18.50 


1930 


768,000 


757 


581,200 


74,733 


12.90 


1931 


688,500 


692 


476,382 


42,024 


8.80 


1932 


462,500 


624 


288,750 


34,949 


12.10 


1933 


667,800 


794 


530,133 


85,530 


16.10 


1934 


486,500 


847 


412,055 


117,999 


28.60 


1935 


612,500 


635 


572,625 


116,418 


20.30 


1936 


591,000 


765 


451,975 


101,856 


22.50 


1937 


675,000 


883 


595,815 


143,058 


24.00 


1938 


603,500 


844 


509,470 


115,428 


22.70 


1939 


843,000 


964 


812,540 


123,893 


15.20 


1940 


498,000 


1,038 


516,835 


85,792 


16.60 


1941 


488.000 


928 


452,825 


132,291 


29.20 


1942 


539,000 


1,052 


566,810 


221,538 


39.10 


1943 


580,000 


935 


542,200 


219,074 


40.40 


1944 


684,000 


1,077 


736,990 


317,628 


43.10 


1945 


722,000 


1,100 


794,310 


349,148 


44.00 


1946 


802,000 


1,138 


912,970 


451,639 


49.50 


1947 


783,000 


1,139 


892,205 


374,513 


42.00 


1948 


594,000 


1,239 


739,380 


368,040 


49.80 


1949 


621.000 


1,178 


731,530 


352,508 


48.20 


1950 


640,000 


1,441 


858,140 


477,508 


55.60 


1951 


735,000 


1,331 


978,375 


523,358 


53.50 


1952 


735,000 


1,222 


898,090 


448,582 


49.90 


1953 


674.000 


1,235 


832,305 


447,076 


53.70 


1954 


686,000 


1,204 


889,490 


483,003 


54.30 


1955 


653,000 


1,499 


978,776 


520,845 


53.20 


1956 


579,000 


1,661 


961,495 


496,324 


51.60 


1957 


443,000 


1,469 


650,780 


358,442 


55.10 


1958 


429,000 


1,718 


736,855 


427,307 


58.00 


1959 


458,500 


1,533 


702,942 


407,055 


57.90 


1960 


457,500 


1,836 


839,870 


512,731 


61.10 


1961 


463,000 


1,797 


832,215 


541,468 


6.5.10 


1962 


483,000 


1,890 


912,810 


549,594 


60.20 


1963 


460,500 


1,999 


920,660 


535,622 


58.18 


1964 


416,000 


2,282 


949,450 


549,875 


57.90 


1965 


375,000 


1,840 


690,050 


442,796 


64.20 


1966** 


404,500 


1,864 


754,025 


513,969 


66.60 



* Source: N. C. and USDA Crop Reporting Service 
** Preliminary for 1966. 

20 



North Carolina Burley Crops 
1928-1966* 







Yield Per 












Acre 


Production 


Value 


Average 


Year 


No. Acres 


(Pounds) 


(1,000 lbs.) 


(1,000 Dollars) 


Price 


1928 


3,600 


650 


2,340 


$ 690 


$29.50 


1929 


5,500 


730 


4,015 


863 


21.50 


1930 


7,200 


750 


5,400 


853 


15.80 


1931 


7,100 


710 


5,041 


464 


9.20 


1932 


6,500 


735 


4,778 


726 


15.20 


1933 


9,200 


785 


7,222 


715 


9.90 


1934 


5,500 


870 


4,785 


809 


17.50 


1935 


5,200 


925 


4,810 


1,025 


21.30 


1936 


6,000 


900 


5,400 


2,095 


38.80 


1937 


9,000 


975 


8,775 


1,787 


21.40 


1938 


8,600 


900 


7,740 


1,308 


16.90 


1939 


8,100 


1,070 


8,667 


1,447 


16.70 


1940 


6,500 


1,050 


6,825 


1,242 


18.20 


1941 


6,200 
6,600 


1,075 
1,150 


6,665 


2,093 


31.40 
42.30 


1942 


7,590 


3,211 


1943 


8,500 


1,225 


10,412 


5,102 


49.00 


1944 


12,000 


1,390 


16,680 


8,157 


48.90 


1945 


13,000 


1,500 


19,500 


7,568 


38.30 


1946 


9,800 


1,475 


14,455 


5,999 


41.50 


1947 


9,600 


1,560 


14,976 


6,335 


42.30 


1948 


10,300 


1,680 


17,304 


8,012 


46.30 


1949 


10,800 


1,440 


15,552 


6,750 


43.40 


1950 


10,500 


1,700 


17,850 


9,175 


51.40 


1951 


12,200 


1,750 


21,350 


11,572 


54.20 


1952 


12,000 


1,680 


20,160 


9,818 


48.70 


1953 


11,400 


1,800 


20,520 


11,019 


53.70 


1954 


12,700 


1,920 


24,384 


12,680 


52.00 


1955 


9,800 


1,900 


18,620 


10,651 


57.20 


1956 


9,400 


1,850 


17,390 


10,747 


61.80 


1957 


9,600 


1,975 


18,960 


11,073 


58.40 


1958 


9,300 


2,000 


18,600 


11,978 


64.40 


1959 


9,800 


2,060 


20,188 


11,426 


56.60 


1960 


9,500 


1,940 


18,430 


12,016 


65.20 


1961 


10,400 


2,090 


21,736 


14,346 


66.00 


1962 


11,000 


2,185 


24,035 


14,421 


60.00 


1963 


11,000 


2,285 


25,135 


13,573 


54.00 


1964 


9,700 


2,165 


21,000 


12,054 


57.40 


1965 


8,900 


2,030 


18,067 


12,159 


67.30 


1966** 


8,000 


2,250 


18,000 


12,150 


67.50 



* Source: N. C. and USDA Crop Reporting Service. 
** Preliminary for 1966 with value based on market average. 



21 



N. C Burley Tobacco Allotments 
1967 



County No. Farms 

Alleghany 533 

Ashe 2,539 

Avery 249 

Brunswick 1 

Buncombe 2,973 

Burke 14 

Caldwell 19 

Cherokee 189 

Clay 218 

Cleveland 9 

Davidson 2 

Gaston 1 

Graham 695 

Granville 1 

Haywood I954 

Henderson 113 

Iredell 2 

Jackson 289 

McDowell 70 

Macon 241 

Madison 2,823 

Mitchell 956 

Polk 6 

Rutherford 56 

Stokes 2 

Surry 7 

Swain 219 

Transylvania 72 

Watauga 1,654 

Wilkes 8 

Yancey I325 

State Totals 17,740 8,819.87 1-31 

Source: USD A Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Services. 



217.73 


9 


1,045.59 


3 


108.15 


11 


0.09 


31 


1,398.76 


2 


4.47 


21 


6.75 


20 


67.44 


16 


84.53 


12 


3.39 


22 


0.97 


26 


0.50 


28 


301.22 


8 


0.12 


30 


949.80 


6 


43.54 


16 


0.95 


26 


109.21 


10 


24.66 


18 


77.01 


13 


2,066.81 


1 


468.89 


7 


1.75 


24 


24.10 


19 


0.34 


29 


0.94 


27 


71.44 


14 


28.13 


17 


727.87 


6 


1.86 


23 


982.86 


4 



22 



N. C. Flue-Cured Tobacco Allotments 
1967 



County 


No. Farms 


Acreage 


Alamance 


1,431 


3,984.63 


Alexander 


951 


1,142.25 


Anson 


267 


333.28 


Beaufort 


2,304 


8,070.05 


Bertie 


1,666 


4,811.40 


Bladen 


3,047 


6,274.74 


Brunswick 


1,687 


2,799.39 


Burke 


1 


0.48 


Cabarrus 


1 


0.02 


Caldwell 


264 


405.77 


Camden 


2 


3.95 


Carteret 


351 


1,139.24 


Caswell 


1,916 


7,765.90 


Catawba 


3 


3.20 


Chatham 


1,031 


2,422.94 


Chowan 


183 


463.36 


Cleveland 


1 


0.29 


Columbus 


4,615 


13,997.76 


Craven 


1,678 


7,209.94 


Cumberland 


2,404 


4,536.70 


Dare 


1 


0.06 


Davidson 


1,821 


2,757.66 


Davie 


812 


984.80 


Duplin 


4,143 


13,087.03 


Durham 


945 


3,125.46 


Edgecombe 


1,458 


9,747.55 


Forsyth 


2,218 


4,067.78 


Franklin 


2,627 


9,660.40 


Gaston 


1 


3.88 


Gates 


123 


229.78 


Granville 


2,158 


11,327.46 


Greene 


1,246 


10,155.30 


Guilford 


3,158 


7,681.02 


Halifax 


2,061 


4,993.21 


Harnet 


3,417 


12,239.35 


Hertford 


896 


2,761.28 


Hoke 


736 


2,168.18 


Iredell 


796 


1,030.58 


Johnston 


5,242 


19,319.70 


Jones 


895 


4,594.68 


Lee 


1,282 


3,478.93 


Lenoir 


1,839 


11,961.93 


Martin 


1,474 


7,226.08 


Montgomery 


391 


815.22 


Moore 


1,536 


4,152.81 


Nash 


2,866 


15,368.38 


New Hanover 


83 


180.24 


Northampton 


215 


402.22 


Onslow 


1,771 


5,281.75 


Orange 


964 


2,807.35 


Pamlico 


367 


928.42 


Pender 


1,618 


2,791.17 


Person 


1,753 


8,127.77 


Pitt 


2,609 


21,363.17 


Randolph 


1,608 


2,768.33 



Poundage 



Rank 



6,571,058 
1,759,342 
482,124 
14,020,323 
8,947,072 
11,802,832 
5,270,425 
822 
14 
682,337 
8,092 
1,980,838 
13,049,710 
4,053 
3,521,279 
807,446 
501 
30,876,544 
13,104,244 
8,438,209 
67 
4,262,360 
1,409,391 
24,479,742 
4,651,219 
19,164,946 
6,350,633 
16,991,436 
5,083 
407,211 
18,885,792 
20,995,920 
12,616,101 
9,372,462 
24,475,408 
5,040,537 
3,944,756 
1,522,052 
38,429,489 
8,505,764 
6,126,967 
24,446,524 
14,829,080 
1,220,012 
7,152,468 
29,834,231 
285,440 
651,771 
8,923,165 
4,763,345 
1,427,285 
4,975,126 
14,381,317 
41,331,933 
4,206,743 



36 

51 

61 

22 

30 

26 

39 

68 

71 

59 

65 

50 

24 

67 

47 

58 

69 

4 

23 

33 

70 

44 

55 

10 

43 

14 

37 

17 

66 

62 

15 

13 

25 

29 

11 

40 

46 

53 

2 

32 

38 

12 

20 

57 

35 

6 

63 

60 

31 

42 

54 

41 

21 

1 

45 



23 



N. C. Flue-Cured Tobacco Allotments 
1967 (Continued) 



Connty 


No. Farms 


Aeruse 


Poandace 


Rank 


Richmond 


926 


1,761.79 


2,644,975 


48 


Robeson 


4,574 


17,535.40 


36,219,008 


3 


Rockingham 


2,951 


11,057.52 


18,641,737 


16 


Rowan 
Sampson 


22 
6,079 


22.91 
12,933.88 


29,048 
25,640,048 


64 
9 


Scotland 


523 


974.46 


1,636,026 


62 


Stokes 


2,784 


9,717.76 


15,501,288 


19 


Surry 


3,054 


9,282.26 


16,785,386 


18 


Vance 


1,373 


6,939.08 


11,544,996 


27 


Wake 


3,624 


16,510.43 


29,948,837 


5 


Warren 


1,789 


5,155.31 


8,075,521 


34 


Washington 


283 


813.63 


1,331,605 


66 


Wajme 


3,062 


12,314.08 


25,729,112 


8 


Wilkes 


930 


1,305.24 


2,078,840 


49 


Wilson 


2,084 


14,324.76 


29,169,900 


7 


Yadkin 


2,719 


6,837.91 


11,509,933 


28 


Unadjusted 










State Total 


114,710 


400,440.64 


743,917,301 


1-71 


Under-marketing 1966 — 


36,426.86 


66,175,504 




Over-marketing 1966 


12,540.50 


23,488,390 





Net under-marke 


ting 








1966 


23,886.36 


42,687,114 


— 


N. C. Total Allotment 








1967 


114,710 


424,327.00 


786,604,415 


1-71 



State Summary 

(Continued from page 15) 

Last year approximately three-fourths of the crop was marketed before 
the recess. 

Average prices were higher for around two-thirds of the grades with 
most of the others showing no change from last year. Increases ranged 
from $1.00 to $3.00 per hundred pounds; however, several grades of lower 
tips and non-descript gained $6.00 to $9.00. The practical top was $75.00 
with occasional baskets of better grades selling for $76.00. 

Burley sales established a record high average of $67.28 in 1966. Producers 
sold 16,086,374 pounds for $10,822,832 up slightly from 1965 when producers 
sold 15,614,115 pounds for $10,460,713 averaging $67.00. 

Final sales were held on January 10 after 22 sales days — two days more 
than in 1965. 



24 



North Carolina Tobacco Warehouses 
and Operators By Belts and Markets 

BORDER BELT 

Chadbourn (one set buyers) 

Producers^Jack W. Garrett, J. Franklin Bullard 
Green-Teachey — J. C. Green 

Clarkton (one set buyers) 

Bright Leaf— Joe Stephenson & Brothers 

New Clarkton Warehouse— J. M. Talley, J. C. Hartley 

Fair Bluff (one set buyers) 

Powell— A. H. Powell & Sons 

Riverside— Robert Musgrave, Aaron Parrish, Bob Musgrave 

Planters— Carl Meares, Randolph Currin 

Fairmont (four sets buyers) 

People's Big 5— E. J. Chambers, Leggett & Garrett Company 
Davis-Mitchell-Planters— F. A. Davis, Harry & Jack Mitchell, G. R. 

Royster, Daniel 
Holiday-Frye— E. H. Frye, J. W. & J. M. Holliday 
Square Deal 1-2-3— W. C. Bassett 

Star Carolina 1-2-3— W. M. Puckett, A. M. Best, C. A. Blankenship 
Liberty-Twin States— P. R. Floyd, Jr., Paul Wilson, F. P. Joyce, Joe 

Pell, R. J. Harris 
Big Brick- V. J. Griffin, A. D. Lewis, Jr. 

Fayetteville (one set buyers) 

Big Farmers 1 & 2— P. L. Campbell, A. L. Talley 
Planters — J. W. Stephenson, J. C. Adams 

Lumberton (three sets buyers) 

Carolina — J- L. Townsend, Jr., James Johnson, Jr. 
Smith-Dixie — Furman Biggs, Sr. & Jr. 
Hedgpeth— R. A. Hedgpeth, R. L. Rollins 
Liberty — R. H. Livermore 
Star, Inc. — Hogan Teater, D. T. Stephenson 
Lumberton Cooperative — C. E. McLaurin, Mgr. 

Tabor City (one set buyers) 

By-Pass Carolina & New Farmers— R. C. Coleman, Mrs. Harriett Sikes 
Planters — Don Watson, Mgr. 

Whiteville (three sets buyers) 

Crutchfield— G. E. & R. W. Crutchfield 

Lea's Big Dixie — William Townes Lea, Louie Love 

Moore's — A. H. Moore, C. C. Mason, C. F. Jeffcoat 

Nelson's — John H. Nelson, Jim Smith 

Planters— A. O. King, Jr., J. W. Peay 

Gray-Neal Farmers — Columbus County — A. Dial Gray, J. L. Neal 

Liberty — J. W. Hooks, 1. A. Barefoot & Sons 

Smith— Ernest Smith, Joe T. Smith, Jr., Percy McKeithan 

25 



EASTERN BELT 

Ahoskie (one set buyers) 

Basnight No. 1-2-3— L. L. Wilkens, H. G. Veazey 

Farmers No. 1 & 2— W. M. Odoms, Pierce & Winborne 
Clinton (one set buyers) 

Carolina— L. D. Herring, C. J. Strickland, N. L. Daughtry 

Ross No. 2 — Clarence Kirven, Jr., W. K. Beech 

Farmers— J. J. Hill, W. M. Buck 

Dunn (one set buyers) 

Big 4 Warehouse— Tom Smothers, Jack Calhoun, Norman Hardee 

Planters— Leland Lee, J. M. Smothers 
Farmville (two sets buyers) 

Bell's— Bell Brothers 

Fountain & Monk No. 1 — John N. Fountain, Mgr. 

Fountain & Monk No. 2— John N. Fountain, Mgr. 

Planters & Prewits— Chester Worthington, W. 0. Newell, B. S. Correll 

Lee's — Gordon Lee 

Goldsboro (one set buyers) 

Carolina— S. G. Best, D. V. Smith, D. Price 

Farmers No. 1— S. B. Hill, Carl Holloman, J. F. Hill 

Big Brick — J. R. Musgrave 

Victory— Richard Gray, Clarence Whitley 
Greenville (five sets buyers) 

Cannon's— W. T. Cannon, Carlton Dail 

Farmers— W. A. Tripp, Dal Cox, T. P. Thompson 

Star-Planters — Harding Suggs, B. B. Suggs, Sr. 

Keel — J. A. Worthington 

New Independent— Bob Cullifer, F. L. Blount 

Raynor-Forbes— Noah Raynor, A. H. Forbes 

Harris & Rogers — R. E. Rogers 

New Carolina— Larry Hudson, Laddie Avery, C. C. Harris 
Kinston (four sets buyers) 

Central— W. I. Herring, Bill King 

Farmers — John T. Jenkins 

Knott's 1 & 2— H. G. Knott, W. E. Brewer 

New Dixie— J. T. Jenkins 

Sheppard's— J. T. Sheppard 

New Central— W. I. Herring, Bill King 

The Star Warehouse No. 2— Dempsey Hodges, Virgil Harper 

Banner— K. W. Loftin, John Heath 

Brooks Warehouse— Roger Brooks, Jr., Frederick Brooks 
Robersonville (one set buyers) 

Red Front-Adkins & Bailey— J. H. Gray, Jack Sharpe 

Planters No. 1 & 2— H. T. Highsmith, E. G. Anderson, Frank Everett 
Rocky Mount (four sets buyers) 

Cobb & Carlton No. 1 & 2— W. E. Cobb, J. C. Carlton 

Mangum— Roy M. Phipps 

26 



Planters No. 2-3— W. H. Faulkner, Mgr. 

Smith No. 1 & 2— James D. Smith 

Works Warehouse — R. J. Works, Jr. 

Peoples Warehouse Company, Inc.— Guy Barnes, Gene Simmons, Jimmy 

Walker 
Farmers Warehouse, Inc.— J. C. Holt Evans, Mgr. 
Fenners — J. B. Fenner 

Smithfield (two sets buyers) 

Big Planters— Mrs. W. A. Carter, Paul McMillan, Jack Wooten, Prank 

Skinner 
Farmers No. 1 & 2— Joe & C. E. Stephenson 
Gold Leaf No. 1 & 2— R. A. Pearce 
Stephenson Riverside— Gilbert Stephenson 
Wallace No. 1 & 2 — Lawrence & Dixon Wallace 

Tarboro (one set buyers) 

Clarks No. 1 & 2— H. I. Johnson, S. A. McConkey 

Farmers No. 1 — W. L. House, J. P. Bunn 

Farmers No. 2— W. L. House, J. P. Bunn 

Victory No. 1 & 2— Cliif Weeks, W. L. Leggett — 

Wallace (one set buyers) 

Blanchard & Farrior— O. C. Blanchard, W. H. Farrior 
Hussey No. 1 & 3— Joe Bryant, Bill Hussey 
Sheffields— John Sheffield 
Farmers — H. G. Perry 

Washington (one set buyers) 
Sermon's — W. J. Sermon 
Talley-Hassell— M. M. Hassell, W. G. Talley 

Wendell (one set buyers) 

Liberty-Farmer — H. H. & Berdon Eddins 
Northside — G. Dean, Bill Sanders 
Banner — C. P. Southerland 

Williamston (one set buyers) 

Rogers Warehouse — Urbin Rogers, Russell Rogers, Leland Barnhill 
New Dixie — C. Fisher Harris, J. Elmo Lilley 

Wilson (five sets buyers) 

Big Dixie — E. B. Hicks, W. C. Thompson 

Wainwright — G. L. Wainwright 

Center Brick No. 1-2-3 — Cozart & Eagles Company 

Growers Cooperative — S. E. Griffin, Mgr. 

New Planters No. 1 & 2— R. T. & W. C. Smith, B. S. Carr 

Smith Warehouse, Inc. — H. H. Harris, Jr., Mgr. 

Watson— W. H. Cozart, Jr., Pres. 

Clark's— C. R. & Boyd Clark 

New Liberty — Carl B. Renfro 

Bob's Warehouse — Bob Clark 

Windsor (one set buyers) 

Plants 1 & 2— C. B. & B. U. Griffin, Dave Newsom 



27 



Farmers 1 & 2— Grover & B. H. Jernigan, Bill Davis, M. W. Britt, 
Frank Perry, C. W. Parrish 



MIDDLE BELT 

Aberdeen (one set buyers) 

New Aberdeen — Tom Faulkner 
Planters — W. Fentriss Phillips 
Hardee's — Hugh T. Hardee 

Carthage (one set buyers) 

McConnells — C. Hoover Carter, R. J. Brim, Jr. 

Victory — Buck Layton 

New Farmers Warehouse — Bill Carter, Sr., Billy Carter, Jr. 

Durham (three sets buyers) 
Liberty — Walker Stone 

Roycroft— H. T. & J. K. Roycroft, Randolph Currin 
Star — A. L. Carver, Cozart, Currin 

Farmers-Planters— J. M. Talley, Howard Talley, Bob Dale, Sam Man- 
gum 

Ellerbe (one set buyers) 

Farmers — Bill Maurer, Guy Sutton 
Richmond — County — Bud Rummage 

Fuquay-Varina (two sets buyers) 

Big Top— Talley Brothers, E. E. Clayton 
New Deal— W. M., A. R. & A. L. Talley 
Goldleaf— J. W. Dale 
Carolina — P. L. Campbell 
Roberts — Joe, John & Earl Roberts 
Growers — King Roberts 
Dixie — King Roberts 
Star — King Roberts 

Henderson (two sets buyers) 

Moore's Big Banner — A. H. Moore, C. E. Jeffcoat 

Carolina — J. S. Royster, M. H. High, B. W. Young 

Farmers — W. J. Alston, Jr. 

High Price — C. J. Fleming, C. B. Turner 

Liberty — George T. Robertson 

Ellington — F. H. Ellington & Sons 
Louisburg (one set buyers) 

Big Franklin— S. T. & H. B. Cottrell 

Ford's — Charlie Ford 

Friendly Four — James Speed, Gus McGhee 
Oxford (two sets buyers) 

Banner — Mitchell — David Mitchell 

Mangum-Farmers — Julian Adcock, S. B. Knott 

Fleming No. 1 & 2— C. B. Watkins, D. T. Currin 

Planters & Johnson — C. R. Watkins, C. R. Watkins, Jr., T. J. Currin 

28 



Owens No. 1 & 2— J. S. Watkins, L. Gregory 

Granville— L. S. Bryan, Jr., Sherman Bullock, Sidney Sherman 

Yeargin — W. W. Yeargln 

Sanford (one set buyers) 

Twin City 1 & 2— W. M. Carter, T. V. Mansfield, Bill Carter, Jr. 

Morgan's — Jimmy Morgan 

Castleberry's— C. N. Castleberry, R. F. Castleberry 

Warrenton (one set buyers) 
Boyd's— W. P. Burwell 

Centre— M. P. Carroll, E. W. Radford, E. M. Moody 
Farmers — E. G. Tarwater 
Thompson — C. E. Thompson 
Currin's No. 1 & 2— C. W. Currin 



OLD BELT 

Burlington (one set buyers) 

Carolina — Lee Russell, Bob Rainey, Dean Rainey 
Coble — N. C. Newman, Joe Robertson 
Farmers — Bill McCauley, Glenn McCray 

Greensboro (one set buyers) 

Greensboro Tobacco Warehouse Co.— R. C. Coleman, Manager 
Guilford County Tobacco Warehouse Co.— H. P. Smothers, W. B. Hull 

Madison (one set buyers) 

New Brick — S. F. Webster, Lloyd Webster 
Carolina— S. F. Webster, Lee McCollum 

Sharpe & Smith-Farmers- W. S. Smith, D. C. Hoilman, Banner Wil- 
liams 

Mebane (one set buyers) 

Farmers 1 & 2 — Joe Dillard, Jule Allen 

Piedmont Warehouses— A. 0. King, Jr., Billy Hopkins, Mutt Aldridge, 
Wray King 

Mt. Airy (one set buyers) 

New Farmers— Tom Jones, Buck White, O. L. Badgett, F. V. Dearmin 

Hunters— J. W & J. L. Hunter 

Dixie— W. H. Brown, H. Y. Hodges, Fred E. Chilton 

Reidsville (one set buyers) 

Farmers— C. E. Smith, P. D. Michael, D. H. Huffines 
Leader-Watts— A. P. Sands, W. A. McKinney 
Smothers— T. G. & J. M. Smothers 
Brown's— C. E. Smith, P. D. McMichael, D. H. Huffines 

Roxboro (one set buyers) 

Farmers — Lindsay Wagstaff , R. L. Hester 

Hyco— F. J. Hester, Jr. 

Foacre — H. W. Winstead, Jr., Pres. 

Planters No. 2— T. O. Pass 

Pioneer — T. T. & Elmo Mitchell, Roy Carlton 

29 



Stoneville (one set buyers) 

Joyce's No. 1 & 2—0. P. Joyce, Carl Pell 
Farmers— W. Q. Chilton 

Piedmont— R. N. Linville, Robert Rakestraw, Clarence Peeple, G. Rake- 
straw, W. Q. Chilton 

Winston-Salem (four sets buyers) 

Brown- R. W. Newsome, W. B. Simpson 

Carolina-Star— G. H. Robertson, H. M. Bouldin 

Growers— C. E. Joyce, W. G. Sheets, J. R. Pell, M. M. Joyner 

Pepper No. 1 & 2— F. L. Kellman, C. F. Hutchins, Joe & Baxter Cook 

Taylor— Paul Taylor, Paris M. Pepper, Kelly Ritter, John Nelson 

Big Winston— R. T. & J. F. Carter 

Cooks No. 1 & 2— B. E. Cook, William Fowler, Claude Strickland, Jr. 



BURLEY BELT 

Asheville (two sets buyers) 

Burley-Dixie No. 1 & 2— R. A. Owen 
Planters No. 1 & 2— J. W. Stewart 
Walker Warehouse— James E. Walker 
Day's — Charlie Day 

Boone (one set buyers) 

Farmers & Big Burley— Joe E. Coleman 

West JefiFerson (one set buyers) 

Tri-State Burley— C. C. Taylor, Rex Taylor 
Farmers Burley— Tom Faulkner 



30 



STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 



James A. Graham, Commissioner 
Ex-Ojficio ChairwMn 

J. Atwell Alexander Stony Point 

Richard N. Barber, Jr. Waynesville 

Thomas 0. Gilmore Julian 

Claude T. Hall Roxb'oro 

Thomas G. Joyner Garysburg 

George P. Kittrell Corapeake 

Charles F. Phillips Thomasville 

J. H. Poole West End 

Henry Gray Shelton Speed 

David Townsend, Jr Rowland 



I 



31 



DOMESTIC CIGARETTE CONSUMPTION 
BY KINDS 1966 




Total Domestic Consumption 
522 Billion Cigarettes